The Rep Partners with TheatreSquared for Arkansas New Play Fest Saturday

14198284829_73ea38a913_kIt’s happening again!

Arkansas Repertory Theatre is thrilled to once again participate in TheatreSquared’s 2015 Arkansas New Play Fest. With the majority of the Play Fest being held in Fayetteville, two productions will be read at Arkansas Repertory Theatre on Saturday, June 27.

The two staged reading performances include Uncle by Lee Blessing (2 p.m.) and Dust by Qui Nguyen (7 p.m.) and will take place in The Rep’s Lobby, located on the ground level. Admission is free of charge and open to the public. Here is a little bit more about these stories:

  • Uncle by Lee Blessing: From Pulitzer Prize and Tony Award nominee Lee Blessing (A Walk in the Woods), a comedy about an academic sabbatical gone terribly awry. Dr. Paul Waymiller is facing a “publish or perish” deadline on his book about Chekov’s masterpiece, Uncle Vanya. With his career in the balance, he refuses to be distracted by anything—be it his imminent divorce, Vanya himself, or the interdimensional wormhole that’s opened up in his backyard.
  • Dust by Qui NNguyen: Dust is the story of Thuy, a girl who sets out to find her ex-G.I. father—who has kept her existence a secret from his wife for 16 years. Blending live hip-hop, raw emotion and wry wit, Dust recasts the American dream through the eyes of an Amer-Asian teenager in this redemptive, cross-cultural coming-of-age story. It’s the newest work by Arkansas native Qui Nguyen (2014 Sundance Institute Fellow).

The  Arkansas New Play Fest is a collaboration between The Rep and TheatreSquared, located in Fayetteville. The collaboration is designed to introduce promising new works for the stage to audiences in northwest and central Arkansas and to encourage conversation about the themes of these new plays. There will be a talkback session with the playwright and the cast following each reading.

Get more information about event at The Rep here and more information about the festival here!

August Tuesday: Q&A with Lighting Designer Yael Lubetzky

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Susanne Marley (Violet Weston) in August: Osage County. Photo by Stephen B. Thornton.

We are in our final week of August: Osage County and before the cast takes their final bow this weekend, we would like to highlight one of the many incredible design elements of the play: the lighting.

Arkansas Repertory Theatre veteran Yael Lubetzky is the designer behind the powerful lighting that helps capture the emotion of each captivating scene in this dark comedy.

We had the chance to talk to her about what sparked her interest in lighting design for theatre, her approach to a play like August: Osage County and more. See what she had to say for our final installment of August Tuesday:

Q: What piqued your interest in lighting design?

A: I think I was Intrigued by what lighting can do to help tell a story. I believe that light in the theatre can have a breath and movement to it in a similar way as music and dance. And the way these things combine together with storytelling was fascinating to me. Lighting can be a powerful tool in many ways in the theatre. It can tell you where to look, and when, as well as how you might experience something in a specific moment by the way it is lit. I think that I am mostly intrigued by the emotional aspect of lighting design in a production– how lighting can help define and shape those moments, sometimes in very subtle ways, and other times in very dramatic ways. And the collaborative process of finding the language of a story visually. In the theatre, we all try to collaborate as artists to help bring a vision to life. And sometimes you find things out during that process that you hadn’t thought of. Something incredible happens during the journey of trying things. Those moments are some of my favorite.

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Susanne Marley (Violet Weston) and Cassandra Seidenfeld (Johnna Monevata). Photo by Stephen B. Thornton.

Q: How do you approach the lighting design for a play like August: Osage County?   

A: August Osage County is an amazing play. As in all projects I work on, I usually read the play or libretto a number of times and take notes about what the story and setting calls for and then after that I add in my other design ideas . Early on, I have a conversation with the director. In our case, the wonderful Bob Hupp and I talk through our initial ideas for the piece. And as soon as I see the preliminary scenic drawings, I have many conversations with the scenic designer. Mike Nichols designed the fantastic set you see in August. He and I worked very closely in a play like this to make certain things work. This particular play takes place in many rooms all over the house and different times of day. It is extremely cinematic the way the story is told, so that was extremely important in the lighting design. The other aspect was the transitions, and how in this play, the transitions through light, sound and staging is also telling a story and moving the piece forward. Some of the most important parts of lighting design is how you get from one place to another. That journey visually is a very strong aspect in the design of this show. We try to set the tone for where we are going, or where we just came from both emotionally and physically in these transitions, while also making any scenic/prop changes needed for the next scene.

Q: How does the set for August: Osage County affect your lighting design?  

A: The set– designed by Mike Nichols– for August: Osage County is a character in itself and a huge part of this play.  As soon as I saw his preliminary sketches and drawings, I loved it. I knew it was going to be challenging, but I was really excited to work on it with him and I am thrilled with the way it all turned out.

The set dictates some of what the light can and can’t do. We have hallways and ceilings and three stories with walls and windows taped shut for most of the show, along with two stairways and an outside porch and scenes take place in all of these places. But just like in a real home, we wanted to create the feeling of shadows and light in a house with hallways and ceilings. Mike and I worked together closely to try to figure out ways to hide lights in certain places to create this kind of atmosphere and also be able to light people underneath ceilings and walking in and out of hallways. And it was extremely important that each room could be isolated at times. Dan Kimble, The Rep’s Master Electrician, did an incredible job with the crew hanging and wiring all of these things to make it happen. The set has a ton of texture and amazing props to make it feel lived in, but at the same time it has a skeleton around it of beams. There is so much life in this house, but at the same time there is an eerie looming quality– light and absence of light– and being able to go between these feelings was really important in the lighting design.

Q: What is the best part about designing the lighting for theatre?    

A: That’s a tough question, but I would have to say the collaboration with the other artists and the discovery that you find together while working [is the best part]. I love being in the rehearsal room as much as possible while the actors are working early on if I can, because that is where a lot of discovery of the piece happens and being in that environment is always so enlightening. I think when you try new things even if they don’t work the first time, you learn and sometimes that will spark a whole new idea.

Q: What do you enjoy most about working at The Rep?

A: This is my fourth production here at The Rep. I feel very lucky to keep coming back. It is an amazing group of people and artists who work here. They all care so much about each production and it shows in the dedication to the work and that is a gift to get when you work somewhere. I couldn’t do any of the design work I do here without the collaboration with everyone in all the departments. I definitely feel like we are all a team here making the show come to life. And I couldn’t be more grateful to all the people at The Rep who make that happen.

Purchase your ticket to the play before it ends this Sunday online or by calling the Box Office at (501) 378-0405!

August Tuesday: Q&A with Dialect Coach Stacy Pendergraft

Our final show of the 2014-2015 MainStage Season is upon us!

August: Osage County, a Pulitzer Prize-winning play that is finally taking The Rep stage, will open June 5. And to highlight this critically acclaimed play, we are starting a brand-new blog series throughout the run, showcasing the various aspects of the show.

In the second installment, I was able to talk with the show’s Dialect Coach Stacy Pendergraft on her approach with character dialects for a show like August: Osage County, her actual connection to the play, how she has helped provide more context to the play, plus more.

Here’s what she had to say:

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Stacy Pendergraft

Q: What is your background in theatre?

A: I am an associate professor of theatre at the University of Arkansas at Little Rock. I am the primary professor in the performance and directing track and have just finished my 13th year on faculty there. I came to Little Rock from American Stage in St. Petersburg Florida, where I was the Artistic Associate and Director of Education. I also acted, directed and developed new children’s works for their touring program.

Q: What piqued your interest in theatre and voice coaching?

A: Oh, I’m a lifelong theatre rat. It just so happened that my very small rural Oklahoman town had a vibrant community theatre and my high school had amazingly devoted and highly skilled theatre and music teachers. Also, even though my hometown is small, it is a college town with a strong focus on its performing arts programs. So, my exposure came early and deep both in theatre and music. I suppose my music background developed a real appreciation for diction and placement of speech and singing sounds. In my university training, I gained more specific knowledge about the vocal apparatus and this led to more specific training in voice, phonetics and dialects. So voice and dialect work became a sub-specialty in all of my subsequent professional and educational gigs.

Q: How do you approach being a dialect coach for a play like August: Osage County? Do you observe the rehearsals and work with actors individually on their character dialects?

A: What’s incredibly rewarding about this particular process is that Bob and I are defining a way of working together. It’s not always common to have a dialect coach, and so I am glad to be able to contribute to this production and this particular ensemble. When a dialect or voice coach works with actors, she has to know that any feedback has to take into account each particular actor’s way of working and be sensitive to the way an actor wants to incorporate voice work into their character development. I want to be in-tune with their rehearsal goals and not be an intrusion. So knowing the right way and right time to offer feedback is paramount. This cast has from day one, placed great trust in me, and it is not a charge that I take lightly. They are the ones in front of an audience each night and are the ones the audience will be listening to, and I want to guide them to the most authentic choices possible.

For our production, I started by giving a one-hour dramaturgical presentation the first day of rehearsal on Oklahoma and its dialect. And I should say that like any geographical region, there is not necessarily ‘one sound.’ Rural/urban influences, socioeconomic status, educational level, not to mention the psychology of the human being, all impact the way we sound and the way characters sound, too. I gave the actors a packet of listening resources and basic sound substitutions to help them begin their work. I sit in on rehearsals, tuning my ear to the actors and helping them find the music of the dialect on a day-by-day basis. I am available for individual coaching and questions as needed by the actors. It’s become a rather fluid process.

Q: What is your connection to the writer of this play in particular?

A: I am a native Oklahoman and grew up in roughly the same part of the state that Tracy Letts was raised. He was raised in Durant and I was raised in Ada. Both towns are small Oklahoma college towns. My mother actually went to college for a while at Southeast Oklahoma State University where Tracy’s mom and dad (Billie and Dennis Letts) taught. I also went to college at the University of Tulsa, which factors into the story of Bill and Barbara, characters in the play.

Q: How do you think your background in Oklahoma will help the actors as they prepare for their roles in the show?

A: Researching both the place and sound of Oklahoma, I’ve had to really rediscover my own sound and the place from where I come. I’ve discovered things about Oklahoma that relate to the play that have brought me to a new place of understanding. I think I can answer some specific questions about the play’s given circumstances and the rhythms and nuances of the language that are perhaps not as obvious if you’re not from Oklahoma.

Q: Why should patrons see this production on our stage?

A: August: Osage County is an American play that speaks to me on the same level as Arthur Miller or Tennessee Williams. Along with Angels in America and Clybourne Park, it is, for me, one of the three most important plays written about the fabric of American life in the past 50 years. The characters are epic in scale, richly imagined and full in their powers of expression. The language of the play offers the kind of text actors spend their careers pursuing. And finally, the cast assembled for this production is one that you will remember for a long, long time. They are passionate about this play, and what they are creating with Bob and the rest of the production team at The Rep is not to be missed.

Check back every Tuesday throughout the run of the show (June 5-21) to get a glimpse into a new aspect of the show and get your tickets for the show by calling the Box Office at (501) 378-0405 or visiting TheRep.org.

August Tuesday: An Introduction

THEREP_AUGUST (no credits)-page-001Our final show of the 2014-2015 MainStage Season is upon us!

August: Osage County, a Pulitzer Prize-winning play that is finally taking The Rep stage, will open June 5. And to highlight this critically acclaimed play, we are starting a brand-new weekly blog series, showcasing the various aspects of the show.

To kick things off, we thought it would be a good idea to look at the plot, characters and really why Producing Artistic Director Bob Hupp wanted to bring this show to The Rep stage.

Plot

When the large Weston family unexpectedly reunites after dad disappears, their Oklahoman family homestead explodes in a maelstrom of repressed truths and unsettling secrets. Mix in Violet, the drugged-up, scathingly acidic matriarch, and you’ve got a major new play that unflinchingly—and uproariously—exposes the dark side of the Midwestern American family.

“I knew this production needed to live on the Rep stage, so we’ve had the rights to this play for four years. As my favorite American play of the past decade, the timing is right now—the movie has come and gone and the right actors are available. This is the don’t-miss show of the season,” Hupp said.

Characters

Beverly Weston: The father of the Weston family, aged 69, an alcoholic and washed-up poet. His mysterious disappearance one evening and eventually discovered death are the reasons for the family’s reunion.

Violet Weston: The sharp-tongued matriarch who is addicted to several prescriptions; she is aware of the family’s many secrets and is not hesitant to reveal them.

Barbara Fordham: The oldest daughter of the Weston Family who is the mother of Jean and wife of Bill, though they are currently separated. She has the intense need to control everything around her as it falls apart.

Bill Fordham: Barbara’s estranged husband and Jean’s father who is a college professor. He has left his wife for a younger woman named Cindy, one of his students, but wants to be there for his family.

Jean Fordham: Bill and Barbara’s precocious 14-year-old daughter. She smokes pot and cigarettes, is a vegetarian, loves old movies, and is bitter about her parents’ split.

Ivy Weston: The middle daughter of the Weston family; is the only daughter to stay in Oklahoma and teaches at the local college. Her calm and patient exterior hides a passionate woman who is gradually growing cynical.

Karen Weston: The youngest daughter in the Weston family who is newly engaged to Steve, whom she considers the “perfect man”, and lives with him in Florida, planning to marry him soon. Karen can talk of little else but her own happiness even at her father’s funeral.

Steve Heidebrecht: Karen’s fiancé; a businessman in Florida, (whose business, it is hinted, centers around the Middle East and may be less than legitimate) and is not the “perfect man” that Karen considers him.

Mattie Fae Aiken: Violet’s sister, Charlie’s wife and Little Charles’ mother; she is just as jaded as her sister, constantly belittling her son and antagonizing her husband.

Charles Aiken: Husband of Mattie Fae and the father of Little Charles. Charlie, a genial man, was a lifelong friend of Beverly. He struggles to get Mattie Fae to respect Little Charles.

Little Charles Aiken: Son of Mattie Fae and Beverly, 37 years old who is unemployed and clumsy.

Johnna Monevata: A Cheyenne Indian woman, age 26, whom Beverly hires as a live-in housekeeper shortly before he disappears; Johnna is the silent witness to much of the mayhem in the house.

Sheriff Deon Gilbeau: A high-school classmate and former boyfriend of Barbara’s who returns to the Weston household to relay some news.

Production History

  • The show was originally produced on Aug. 12, 2007 by the Steppenwolf Theatre Company at the Downstairs Theatre in Chicago.
  • The Broadway production began previews on Oct. 30, 2007, at the Imperial Theatre only days before the 2007 Broadway stagehand strike on Nov. 10, which temporarily closed most shows on Broadway. The strike continued through the official opening date of Nov. 20, forcing the show to re-schedule its Dec. 4 opening. The Broadway show closed on June 28, 2009, after 648 performances and 18 previews. The Broadway debut used much of cast from Steppenwolf in Chicago, and opened to receive wide acclaim.
  • The production, originally slated to close on Feb. 17, 2008, was extended for three weeks to March 9 after the strike, and later extended to April 13, 2008, when it was subsequently given an open-ended commercial run.
  • August: Osage County made its UK debut at London’s National Theatre in Nov. 2008.
  • Additionally, a US National Tour was launched at Denver’s Ellie Caulkins Opera House on July 24, 2009. This production went on to tour throughout the country.

Awards

August: Osage County was the recipient of the 2008 Pulitzer Prize for Drama, in addition to winning five 2008 Tony Awards, including Best Play, three 2008 Drama Desk Awards including Outstanding Play, the 2008 New York Drama Critics’ Circle Award for Best Play, the 2008 Drama League Award for Distinguished Production of a Play and the 2008 Outer Critics Circle Award for Outstanding Broadway Play.

Check back every Tuesday throughout the run of the show (June 5-21) to get a glimpse into a new aspect of the show and buy your tickets for the show by calling the Box Office at (501) 378-0405 or visiting TheRep.org.