Ashley Leopoulos

About Ashley Leopoulos

Ashley Leopoulos is Communications Manager for The Rep.

Rebellious Inspiration: Les Miserables

1870 illustration of the Paris Uprising

1870 illustration of the Paris Uprising

Article written by Robert Neblett, Les Miserables Dramaturg

One of the central historical events of the novel and the musical of Les Misérables is the 1832 street battle of the barricades. Many people mistake this rebellion as part of the French Revolution, which actually occurred more than 30 years prior.

Marius, Enjolras, Grantaire, and the other student revolutionaries of the ABC (abaissé) Café are fictional characters invented by Hugo. The Paris Uprising of June 5-6, 1832, also known as the June Rebellion, is historical fact. Hugo’s 1862 novel looks back in time 30 years to a period of social and political turmoil that pitted rich against poor, royalist versus republican, and inexperienced students versus the national guard.

Many catalysts set in motion the events that would erupt in this battle in the streets of Paris. Having never truly recovered from the French Revolution and the Reign of Terror which followed, food shortages and disease had spread through the slums of Paris after the decline of the Bonaparte Empire, which widened the gap between the haves and the have-nots. Several claims to the French throne sparked public debate over the legitimacy of the monarchy of King Louis-Phillipe.

However, the spark that set off the powder keg of public outrage was when General Jean Maximilien Lamarque died on June 1, 1932. Lamarque had been sympathetic to the poor and working classes, but the royalists attempted to hijack his funeral for their own political agenda. Groups of students and workers saw Lamarque’s death as a call to arms and his funeral as a perfect opportunity to make a public statement. Protestors seized his funeral carriage and diverted the funeral procession into the Place de la Bastille.

National guardsman shot into the crowd, causing a riot, during which barricades of furniture and crates and wagons were constructed to protect the protestors from the gunfire of the military. In the end, the 3,000 revolutionaries were no match for the 40,000 militia and army soldiers. 93 insurrectionists were killed, and the June Rebellion became a potent symbol for the growing republican cause, which ultimately resulted in the overthrow of the king in 1848.

Rebellious Inspiration

1870 illustration of the Paris Uprising

1870 illustration of the Paris Uprising

Article written by Robert Neblett, Les Misérables Dramaturg

One of the central historical events of the novel and the musical of Les Misérables is the 1832 street battle of the barricades. Many people mistake this rebellion as part of the French Revolution, which actually occurred more than 30 years prior.

Marius, Enjolras, Grantaire, and the other student revolutionaries of the ABC (abaissé) Café are fictional characters invented by Hugo. The Paris Uprising of June 5-6, 1832, also known as the June Rebellion, is historical fact. Hugo’s 1862 novel looks back in time 30 years to a period of social and political turmoil that pitted rich against poor, royalist versus republican, and inexperienced students versus the national guard.

Many catalysts set in motion the events that would erupt in this battle in the streets of Paris. Having never truly recovered from the French Revolution and the Reign of Terror which followed, food shortages and disease had spread through the slums of Paris after the decline of the Bonaparte Empire, which widened the gap between the haves and the have-nots. Several claims to the French throne sparked public debate over the legitimacy of the monarchy of King Louis-Phillipe.

However, the spark that set off the powder keg of public outrage was when General Jean Maximilien Lamarque died on June 1, 1932. Lamarque had been sympathetic to the poor and working classes, but the royalists attempted to hijack his funeral for their own political agenda. Groups of students and workers saw Lamarque’s death as a call to arms and his funeral as a perfect opportunity to make a public statement. Protestors seized his funeral carriage and diverted the funeral procession into the Place de la Bastille.

National guardsman shot into the crowd, causing a riot, during which barricades of furniture and crates and wagons were constructed to protect the protestors from the gunfire of the military. In the end, the 3,000 revolutionaries were no match for the 40,000 militia and army soldiers. 93 insurrectionists were killed, and the June Rebellion became a potent symbol for the growing republican cause, which ultimately resulted in the overthrow of the king in 1848.

Victor Hugo and Les Miserables

Author of Les Miserables, Victor Hugo

Author of Les Miserables, Victor Hugo

Article written by Robert Neblett, Les Misérables Dramaturg

Victor Hugo (1802-85) was a French poet, novelist, and playwright. He is most commonly associated with the Romantic movement of literature and art in 19th century Europe. Romanticism rejected the scientific goals of the Industrial Revolution and idealized heightened emotion, dreams, nature, a belief in the supernatural, and the superior role of the imagination in the creation of art and literature. The Romantics often reached back into the distant past for inspiration and rejected rules, tradition, and conventions that governed “proper” forms of art, such as those mandated by the French Academy, an intellectual and cultural organization dedicated to formalizing French language and literature.

Victor was the son of a military officer and moved frequently, which allowed him to see much of France and Europe. The early years of his life were filled with political and personal turmoil. Shortly after he was born, Napoléon Bonaparte was named Emperor of France, and Hugo’s childhood was marked by a period of violent political upheaval throughout the country. He secretly married Adèle Foucher when he was 19 years old, and they had several children. When his daughter Léopoldine drowned in 1843, he was devastated.

In 1830, his play Hernani incited riots among its audiences. Prior to its performance, French playwrights were required to adhere to the Neoclassical unities of place, time, and action in their dramatic writing. These rules basically meant that a play’s action must occur in a single venue, take place over a span of time no longer than 24 hours, and must follow a single main plot with no subplots. Hernani defied all of these conventions when it premiered at the Comedie Française in Paris and caused public outrage. Historians have discovered that much of this outrage was manipulated and manufactured by both Hugo and his opponents, the riots becoming acts of theatre in themselves.

In 1841, Hugo became a member of the French Academy, hoping to change its traditional values from within. After several years of open criticism of political leaders in France, he left the country in a period of self-appointed exile from 1851-1870. While in exile in England, he wrote many of his most popular works, including Les Misérables.

When he returned to France in 1870, he was considered a national hero. He became active in politics during the final years of his life. When he died from pneumonia in 1885, over two million people attended his funeral. He was buried in the Panthéon, along with the leading thinkers of his time.

Other novels by Hugo include:

Notre-Dame de Paris (1831) – also known as The Hunchback of Notre-Dame. The publication of Hugo’s novel would ultimately shame the civic leaders of Paris to restore the cathedral and renew an interest in medieval architecture throughout the city.

Quatre-vingt-treize (1874) – recounts the story of the Reign of Terror following the French Revolution.

Victor Hugo and Les Miserables

Author of Les Miserables, Victor Hugo

Author of Les Miserables, Victor Hugo

Article written by Robert Neblett, Les Misérables Dramaturg

Victor Hugo (1802-85) was a French poet, novelist, and playwright. He is most commonly associated with the Romantic movement of literature and art in 19th century Europe. Romanticism rejected the scientific goals of the Industrial Revolution and idealized heightened emotion, dreams, nature, a belief in the supernatural, and the superior role of the imagination in the creation of art and literature. The Romantics often reached back into the distant past for inspiration and rejected rules, tradition, and conventions that governed “proper” forms of art, such as those mandated by the French Academy, an intellectual and cultural organization dedicated to formalizing French language and literature.

Victor was the son of a military officer and moved frequently, which allowed him to see much of France and Europe. The early years of his life were filled with political and personal turmoil. Shortly after he was born, Napoléon Bonaparte was named Emperor of France, and Hugo’s childhood was marked by a period of violent political upheaval throughout the country. He secretly married Adèle Foucher when he was 19 years old, and they had several children. When his daughter Léopoldine drowned in 1843, he was devastated.

In 1830, his play Hernani incited riots among its audiences. Prior to its performance, French playwrights were required to adhere to the Neoclassical unities of place, time, and action in their dramatic writing. These rules basically meant that a play’s action must occur in a single venue, take place over a span of time no longer than 24 hours, and must follow a single main plot with no subplots. Hernani defied all of these conventions when it premiered at the Comedie Française in Paris and caused public outrage. Historians have discovered that much of this outrage was manipulated and manufactured by both Hugo and his opponents, the riots becoming acts of theatre in themselves.

In 1841, Hugo became a member of the French Academy, hoping to change its traditional values from within. After several years of open criticism of political leaders in France, he left the country in a period of self-appointed exile from 1851-1870. While in exile in England, he wrote many of his most popular works, including Les Misérables.

When he returned to France in 1870, he was considered a national hero. He became active in politics during the final years of his life. When he died from pneumonia in 1885, over two million people attended his funeral. He was buried in the Panthéon, along with the leading thinkers of his time.

Other novels by Hugo include:

Notre-Dame de Paris (1831) – also known as The Hunchback of Notre-Dame. The publication of Hugo’s novel would ultimately shame the civic leaders of Paris to restore the cathedral and renew an interest in medieval architecture throughout the city.

Quatre-vingt-treize (1874) – recounts the story of the Reign of Terror following the French Revolution.

 

Arkansas Rep Partners With Local Animal Rescue Organizations This Holiday Season

Dear Friends,

The love of a pet is like no other. Pets give us many wonderful things, and ask nothing in return but a scratch between the ears and a soft spot to sleep in a place they can call home. But thousands of animals in shelters across Central Arkansas only dream of having a home.

So we’re doing something different this December at Arkansas Rep. We’re raising awareness of animal adoption in association with our production of a new musical based on the award-winning novel Because of Winn Dixie, a heartwarming story of a young girl who adopts a dog she finds at a local supermarket.

10952510353_10f75b0212Starring an Irish Wolfhound named Taran, trained by Broadway animal trainer Bill Berloni (Legally Blonde, Annie), and Rep Young Artist Julia Landfair (Les Misérables, Cat on a Hot Tin Roof) in leading roles, Because of Winn Dixie also features music by Tony and Grammy Award winner Duncan Sheik and lyrics by Tony nominee Nell Benjamin.

While we are hard at work creating the world of Winn Dixie on our stage, we are also working with local animal shelters to feature adoptable animals in our lobby and local rescue organizations on our website throughout December. Please help us celebrate this special holiday production and raise awareness of animal adoption in Central Arkansas by making a donation to The Rep in honor of a special pet in your life. The first gift will come from me, in honor of my redbone coonhound, Rocky.

For every gift of $75 and above we receive before December 31, we’ll create an ornament with your pet’s name and display it in the lobby. Or make a gift to The Rep and we’ll recognize a pet from one of our local shelters and display their adoption information in our lobby.

Your tax-deductible gift makes all the difference in the world. Ticket sales cover only half of what it costs to produce the work you see on our stage and to create the community partnerships and educational opportunities that reach thousands of Arkansans each year. The rest must come from good friends like you.

From every rescue dog curled up in a loving home, and from all of us here at Arkansas Repertory Theatre, thank you for making what we do possible.

Warm and furry regards in this holiday season,

blue bob (2)

Robert Hupp, Producing Artistic Director

P.S. As much as we all love our pets, your donation to The Rep may also be in honor or memory of a human friend or loved one. Make a gift today and we’ll send your recipient a holiday card acknowledging your contribution.

You can donate online at www.therep.org/support/donate.

View adoptable animals in your area!

 

Fundraiser for The Rep’s Young Artists Program with Brighton Collectables

Arkansas Repertory Theatre’s

SUMMER MUSICAL THEATRE INTENSIVE

Start your summer on a high note with friends, shopping, entertainment, and a party!

Friends of Young Artists at The Rep,

You are invited for aBrighton Ecard private party at the Brighton Collectables store in Midtown Little Rock (203 N. University Ave. Little Rock, AR 72205) this Sunday, June 2nd, from 5:00-7:00pm. You will need to bring a copy of this email invitation to get into this private event. To RSVP please email guild officer, Pamela McKinnis, at pkmckinnis@jmoutdoors.com. All patrons, friends, and supporters of The Rep are invited.

There will be refreshments and special performancesBrighton Ecard Invitation (3) by Mark Binns and several SMTI alumni! The Young Artist Guild and SMTI will receive 20% of all sales during this party. (It’s never too early to start your Christmas shopping!) In addition to the contributions from the party, for each Independence Charm Holder Bracelet and Americana I.D. Bracelet sold from May 24th through July 31st, 2013, at Brighton Collectables in Midtown Little Rock, the company will contribute 50% of the retail cost to support young artists at The Rep. 

Please stop by and show your support for the young artists at The Rep! We look forward to seeing you there!

The Man Behind “Death of a Salesman”, Arthur Miller

American Playwright Arthur Miller

Arthur Miller, The Playwright

Arthur Miller was born on October 17, 1915, in New York City, to his  Jewish parents, Isidore and Augusta Miller. Arthur lived a comfortable middle class life until age fourteen when the Great Depression struck and his family’s business failed. In high school,Arthur was more actively involved in football and other sports than in his studies. After several rejected applications, Miller was finally admitted to the University of Michigan in 1934, where he studied journalism, economics and history.  It was also in college that Miller discovered his love for play writing and in his junior year, he won $250 in a college play writing contest. Miller graduated from college in 1938 with a   degree in English. In 1940 Miller married his college sweetheart, Mary Slattery.

 During World War II, Miller worked on ships in the Brooklyn Navy Yard and wrote plays for the Columbia Broadcasting System. In 1944, he received his first theatrical break when his play The Man Who Had All the Luck was staged on Broadway. Unfortunately it was not well received. At age 30, Miller  decided to give play writing one last try and diligently spent the next two years writing the play All My Sons, that was co-produced by stage and film director Elia Kazan, who helped him focus and polish the work. All My Sons enjoyed a profitable run of 328 performances and won the Drama Critics’ Circle Award and inspired Miller to carry on with his play writing. But it was with Death of a Salesman that Miller’s reputation as an outstanding play wright was solidified. With Death of a Salesman, Miller became famous. However despite his remarkable success, he  continued to focus his writing on the struggles of the common person—social, economic, political, and personal. In the 1940s and 1950s, the cold war between the Soviet Union and the United States created a mood of fear and suspicion. In particular, political, social, and business leaders were increasingly concerned that  communism threatened the American “way of life.” 

Herbert Block, who signed his work “Herblock”, coined the term “McCarthyism” in this cartoon in The Washington Post

In 1950 Joseph McCarthy and the House Un-American Activities Committee (HUAC), whose mission it was to uncover forces that would subvert this American way of life, started focusing on the intellectual and artisticcommunity in order to find potential communist influences. HUAC targeted both Miller and director Kazan. Citing artistic freedom as his rationale, he refused to cooperate with HUAC that he believed was censoring the critical voice of the American people. Miller was found guilty of contempt of Congress but this was later repealed on account that he had not been informed adequately of the risks involved in incurring contempt. Miller’s  response to the anti-Communist fear and hysteria was The Crucible, where he merged the terror tactics of McCarthyism with the Salem witch hunts of the 17th century.  The Crucible which premiered on Broadway in 1953, became Miller’s most frequently produced play, staged every week somewhere in the world for the past 40 years. It was dramatized on television and in 1996, he adapted the script to a screenplay and the movie was released with his son-in-law, academy award winning  actor, Daniel Day Lewis starring as John Proctor.

“I wished to create a form which, in itself as a form, would literally be the process of Willy Loman’s way of mind. I wished to speak of the salesman most precisely as I felt about him, to give no part of that feeling away for the sake of any effect or any dramatic necessity.”

~Arthur Miller

 In 1956, Miller divorced his first wife Mary, and soon after married actress Marilyn Monroe. However this marriage was short-lived and Miller and Monroe divorced in 1961, a year before Monroe’s death due to drug overdose. Soon after his divorce, Miller met Inge Morath, a  Vienna-born photographer and they were married in February 1962. Miller and Morath spent 40 years together till her death in 2002. In the mid-60s, Miller focused on political activism, becoming the President of PEN, an international writer’s organizing of poets, playwrights, editors, essayists, and novelists. In 1968 he resumed play writing with The Price, a work about the two brothers who cannot overcome their anger with each other. The play enjoyed moderate success. In the 1970s, Miller wrote three plays: The Creation of the World and Other Business (1972), TheAmerican Clock (1976), and The Archbishop’s Ceiling (1977).

The productions of all three works were harshly criticized. During the 1980s,  Arthur Miller’s works experienced a worldwide revival. In 1983, Miller and his wife traveled to Beijing, China to see a production of Death of a Salesman.  Miller never quite enjoyed the success he had in the 40s and the 50s and his last few plays had very short runs on the stage. In his eighties, Miller kept writing social dramas, still driven by the desire to represent the wants, struggles, and frustration of common people. The characters in his plays act out human concerns that are universal. Miller called on his characters to take responsibility for their actions and act on the world that they live in; he rejected self-pity in his characters, no matter how dire their circumstance.

Arthur Miller passed away at the age of 89 on February 10, 2005, surrounded by his family. When he was  dying, he asked to be driven back from New York to New England, where he had written most of his plays. To mourn his death, lights were dimmed on Broadway. Source for this article: www.oldglobe.org

Arkansas Repertory Theatre’s production of Death of a Salesman will run April 26-May 12, 2013. To purchase tickets call (501) 378-0405 or visit www.therep.org

Article written by Werner Trieschmann

World Traveled Artist Lights Up The Rep Stage

Myriam Gadri in Arkansas Repertory Theatre's Production of The Wiz, photo by Stephen B. Thornton

As a vibrant ensemble member in The Rep’s production of The Wiz, cast member Myriam Gadri, has experienced difficulties along her own yellow brick road in life. Born in Lausanne, Switzerland, Myriam and her mother soon moved to Togo, Africa. As a young child, Myriam could be found running, creating music and  most of all dancing. After noticing her talent, her mother began her search to enroll her into a ballet school. “My mother had a difficult time finding a school that would accept me because I was both black and white. Back then, Togo was very divided by race,” said Gadri.

Her mother’s persistence paid off and an all white school accepted Myriam into the school. “It was a completely new experience, I did not look like the other girls in the class,” said Gadri. “Growing up, I was constantly told I was the wrong body type or I was not cut out to dance.”

Myriam and her mother moved often. Myriam’s mother’s job with the International Federation of the Red Cross took them from Switzerland to Africa to Switzerland to England all within a few years. “I was bullied throughout school, but the school in London had great after school programs and every country we moved to, my mother made it her first priority to search for a dance school for me,” said Gadri.

While in London, not only was she studying the art of dance, but she was learning English as her second language. “At first, I was able to communicate through dance and movement only since I could not speak English well at the time,” said Gadri. It was at this after school program that “my teacher had recognized me for my talent in class and used me as a positive example to others in the class. This was the first time I felt encouraged.”

Myriam finished her remaining school years at The BRIT School in London. The BRIT School, according to their website, is an independent, state funded City College for the Technology of the Arts, the only one of its kind dedicated to education and vocational training for the performing arts, media, art and design.

“The BRIT School was the best experience,” said Gadri. “They taught me, you did not need to be any more than who you truly are.”

After acing exams at The BRIT School and adding credits The King & I at the Utopian Operatic Society,  Annie Get Your Gun and La traviata at the Birmingham Operatic Society, Myriam received a full college scholarship to attend London Studio Centre.

Shortly after arriving to the school, she sustained a severe knee injury damaging her ligaments and putting her in physical therapy for three months. The injury kept Myriam out of classes for an entire year. She had to completely retrain her body by starting off in basic dance classes. “It was frustrating, my brain knew what I was trying to do, but my body was not at the level it was before,” said Gadri.

After two years of rehabilitation and dance classes, Myriam auditioned for Broadway Dance Centre and was accepted. “Broadway Dance Centre opened up a world of opportunities for me,” said Gadri. Myriam went on to perform with Maria Torres’ ensemble for the “Ugly Betty” Season 4 launch party, a MTE benefit hosted by Vanessa Williams and performed on the Today Show concert series with PitBull and guest Marc Anthony and Ne-Yo and the NYC Dance Parade.

(Left to Right) Carla Stewart, Myriam Gadri and Kayla Rose Aimable in Arkansas Repertory Theatre's production, photo by Stephen B. Thornton

The Wiz is my first musical in America and this is my first show with an all African-American cast,” said Gadri. “Dance has always been my release. So many of these cast members have been in roles  that I have admired from afar. I am so humbled and I am learning as much from them as I can,” said Gadri.

Myriam’s mindset gave her the motivation to continue to dance. “I did not take the criticism to heart. I don’t settle in and I don’t take for granted what I have,” said Gadri. “I wanted to try this as a career, I never wanted to say ‘what if’.”

The character Myriam relates most closely to in The Wiz are the Lion and the Scarecrow. Throughout the story “they are trying to find what has been within themselves all along.” Myriam offered this advice to aspiring artists like herself, “never give up, if you have a tiny flame inside of you-keep it alive somehow. You never know.”

To see more information about Myriam Gadri click here. Arkansas Repertory Theatre’s production of The Wiz closes April 8.

National NEA Chairman Rocco Landesman visits Arkansas Repertory Theatre

Joy Pennington, Rocco Landesman, Beth Wiedower, Bob Hupp and Warwick Sabin, NEA "Creative Placemaking" panel. Photo by Shelby Brewer, Arkansas Arts Council

Arkansas Repertory Theatre and Oxford American Magazine hosted a panel with the National Endowment for the Arts Chairman, Rocco Landesman on “Creative Placemaking in Arkansas.” Arkansas First Lady, Ginger Beebe welcomed the crowd with opening remarks and Arkansas Arts Council Executive Director Joy Pennington moderated the panel.

Chairman Landesman was joined by The Rep’s Producing Artistic Director, Bob Hupp,  Director of the Arkansas Delta Rural Heritage Development Initiative, Beth Wiedower and Publisher of the Oxford American magazine, Warwick Sabin.

The panel focused on the importance of the creative placemaking and the power of the arts in economic development . “Our role at the NEA is to bring the world of the arts and the ‘real world’ together,” said Chairman Landesman.  “The arts is an ecosystem. The arts not only employee the artisans, it employees the restaurant owner down the street.”

“Since the completion of our 6 million dollar Capital Campaign, Arkansas Repertory Theatre has been an urban pioneer for the economic development of Downtown Little Rock,” said Hupp.  “We would love to have some company.”

Chairman Landesman encouraged “arts organizations to get out into their community.” By creating a community steeped in the arts “communities are more involved through civic engagement, ” said Landesman.

Hupp discussed the innovative ways The Rep brings the arts to Arkansans. “Our Shakespeare in the Park program takes place where are Arkansans are comfortable, their state parks. By bringing the arts to our audience we are breaking down barriers and creating a unique experience with our audience.”

The panel also touched on the importance of technology to promote the arts. “Websites help create a forum of dialogue among our rural communities in the Delta. These artists become resources for one another,” said Wiedower.

“The Oxford American occupies a niche-we protect and perpetuate the best of the Southern Culture,” said Sabin. From Southern musicians to writers to the culinary arts, Oxford American will “leverage the use of technology to broadcast our cultural significance around the world” using pod casts and programming on PBS.

For more photos from the panel click here.

 

A Note from Director Nicole Capri on The Rep’s Young Artists Production “That 80s Show”

Since 2005, I’ve seen hundreds of aspiring young artists graduate through our program to attend some of the best theatre training programs and universities in the country, become professional recording artists, star in films and national tours, earn their actor’s equity card on The Rep’s stage and become teachers, choreographers, directors, actors and working artists in the competitive field of performing arts. Our SMTI staff has tripled, our casts have quadrupled and our Young Artist’s Guild and “family fan club” is the biggest and best around.

Photo by David Knight, George Elrod and Elizabeth Wheeler sing "Video Killed the Radio Star" in Arkansas Repertory Theatre's Young Artist Production "That 80s Show."

But as educational programming continues to grow and expand, I believe it’s so important to remember where we came from.  It is not my life’s goal to create the biggest program in the country, but it is my dream to create one of the best.  That’s why it’s so important that we retain our sense of family, our integrity and our dedication to growing healthy, working young artists and genuinely good human beings.  My staff and I are committed to one thing above all else – loving and nurturing the young artists and creating a safe, professional environment to learn, grow and express themselves with tough and unconditional love.  This is our promise. This is our charge.

A huge thanks to The Young Artist’s Guild for their tireless hours of service, and for their commitment to award an ever increasing number scholarships to SMTI as well as university study each and every year. Special thanks to our SMTI scholarship sponsors Career Staffing Services and The Rebsamen Fund and to the Stover Family, the Brittain Family, the Boyd Family, the Aitken/Carey Family, Rene Julian and Wendy Brandon for their financial support of this year’s show.  Lastly, my love and thanks to the staff, crew and cast of THAT 80’s SHOW for making this year’s production one of the best one’s yet!

Photo by David Knight, Marina Redlich and Samantha Kordsmeier performing "True Colors" in Arkansas Repertory Theatre's Young Artist Production "That 80s Show."

Nicole Capri is the 2011 Governor’s Arts in Education Award recipient. As Resident Director and Director of Education,  Nicole began her professional theatre career as an intern at The Rep in 1988. Almost twenty years later, she returned to The Rep as Resident Director and Director of Education. Now in its 7th successful year, Nicole is also the founder and director of The Rep’s Summer Musical Theatre Intensive training program for young artists – the fastest growing program in the history of The Rep. A theatre, music and dance major at The University of Memphis and The National Theatre of the Deaf’s professional theatre school, Nicole has directed and/or choreographed more than 100 productions. Favorite credits include; The Rep’s productions of Children of a Lessor God, The Foreigner, Glorious and A Christmas Story, Eve in The Apple Tree (Fairmount Theatre of the Deaf/Cleveland Playhouse/International Tour), “Best Performance” (First International Theatre Festival, Volgograd, Russia), Ram In The Thicket (Off Broadway/Judith Anderson Theatre), “Critics Choice Award” Mary in The Miracle Play and Director/Choreographer/Editor for the world premiere of Rich Mullins’ Canticle of the Plains. However, Nicole’s favorite credit to date is working with the amazing and talented young artists at The Rep!