August Tuesday: An Introduction

THEREP_AUGUST (no credits)-page-001Our final show of the 2014-2015 MainStage Season is upon us!

August: Osage County, a Pulitzer Prize-winning play that is finally taking The Rep stage, will open June 5. And to highlight this critically acclaimed play, we are starting a brand-new weekly blog series, showcasing the various aspects of the show.

To kick things off, we thought it would be a good idea to look at the plot, characters and really why Producing Artistic Director Bob Hupp wanted to bring this show to The Rep stage.

Plot

When the large Weston family unexpectedly reunites after dad disappears, their Oklahoman family homestead explodes in a maelstrom of repressed truths and unsettling secrets. Mix in Violet, the drugged-up, scathingly acidic matriarch, and you’ve got a major new play that unflinchingly—and uproariously—exposes the dark side of the Midwestern American family.

“I knew this production needed to live on the Rep stage, so we’ve had the rights to this play for four years. As my favorite American play of the past decade, the timing is right now—the movie has come and gone and the right actors are available. This is the don’t-miss show of the season,” Hupp said.

Characters

Beverly Weston: The father of the Weston family, aged 69, an alcoholic and washed-up poet. His mysterious disappearance one evening and eventually discovered death are the reasons for the family’s reunion.

Violet Weston: The sharp-tongued matriarch who is addicted to several prescriptions; she is aware of the family’s many secrets and is not hesitant to reveal them.

Barbara Fordham: The oldest daughter of the Weston Family who is the mother of Jean and wife of Bill, though they are currently separated. She has the intense need to control everything around her as it falls apart.

Bill Fordham: Barbara’s estranged husband and Jean’s father who is a college professor. He has left his wife for a younger woman named Cindy, one of his students, but wants to be there for his family.

Jean Fordham: Bill and Barbara’s precocious 14-year-old daughter. She smokes pot and cigarettes, is a vegetarian, loves old movies, and is bitter about her parents’ split.

Ivy Weston: The middle daughter of the Weston family; is the only daughter to stay in Oklahoma and teaches at the local college. Her calm and patient exterior hides a passionate woman who is gradually growing cynical.

Karen Weston: The youngest daughter in the Weston family who is newly engaged to Steve, whom she considers the “perfect man”, and lives with him in Florida, planning to marry him soon. Karen can talk of little else but her own happiness even at her father’s funeral.

Steve Heidebrecht: Karen’s fiancé; a businessman in Florida, (whose business, it is hinted, centers around the Middle East and may be less than legitimate) and is not the “perfect man” that Karen considers him.

Mattie Fae Aiken: Violet’s sister, Charlie’s wife and Little Charles’ mother; she is just as jaded as her sister, constantly belittling her son and antagonizing her husband.

Charles Aiken: Husband of Mattie Fae and the father of Little Charles. Charlie, a genial man, was a lifelong friend of Beverly. He struggles to get Mattie Fae to respect Little Charles.

Little Charles Aiken: Son of Mattie Fae and Beverly, 37 years old who is unemployed and clumsy.

Johnna Monevata: A Cheyenne Indian woman, age 26, whom Beverly hires as a live-in housekeeper shortly before he disappears; Johnna is the silent witness to much of the mayhem in the house.

Sheriff Deon Gilbeau: A high-school classmate and former boyfriend of Barbara’s who returns to the Weston household to relay some news.

Production History

  • The show was originally produced on Aug. 12, 2007 by the Steppenwolf Theatre Company at the Downstairs Theatre in Chicago.
  • The Broadway production began previews on Oct. 30, 2007, at the Imperial Theatre only days before the 2007 Broadway stagehand strike on Nov. 10, which temporarily closed most shows on Broadway. The strike continued through the official opening date of Nov. 20, forcing the show to re-schedule its Dec. 4 opening. The Broadway show closed on June 28, 2009, after 648 performances and 18 previews. The Broadway debut used much of cast from Steppenwolf in Chicago, and opened to receive wide acclaim.
  • The production, originally slated to close on Feb. 17, 2008, was extended for three weeks to March 9 after the strike, and later extended to April 13, 2008, when it was subsequently given an open-ended commercial run.
  • August: Osage County made its UK debut at London’s National Theatre in Nov. 2008.
  • Additionally, a US National Tour was launched at Denver’s Ellie Caulkins Opera House on July 24, 2009. This production went on to tour throughout the country.

Awards

August: Osage County was the recipient of the 2008 Pulitzer Prize for Drama, in addition to winning five 2008 Tony Awards, including Best Play, three 2008 Drama Desk Awards including Outstanding Play, the 2008 New York Drama Critics’ Circle Award for Best Play, the 2008 Drama League Award for Distinguished Production of a Play and the 2008 Outer Critics Circle Award for Outstanding Broadway Play.

Check back every Tuesday throughout the run of the show (June 5-21) to get a glimpse into a new aspect of the show and buy your tickets for the show by calling the Box Office at (501) 378-0405 or visiting TheRep.org.

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